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  • Jack Canfield... "Reading Unexpected Miracles made me smile over and over again. I know it will do the same for you. Life is full of miracles. When you expect them, they occur more often... this book will help you create more of them in your life."
  • Dr John Demartini... "One of the benefits of Dr John Hinwood's journey is reflected in his excellent writings, which bring individuals hope, and most definitely a collection of facts, more than just one of fads... he shares a life full of miracles."
  • Mark Victor Hansen... "Having read You Can EXPECT A MIRACLE… The Book To Change Your Life I have only three words for this book. I loved it!"
  • Irena Yashin-Shaw PhD... "If you ever have the opportunity to have John speak to your people or at your event, just grab it. He will literally hand you a miracle. Thanks for everything John."
  • Charles "Tremendous" Jones... "Dr Hinwood's life is filled with miracles because of his great level of expectation. His life of miracles has blessed the lives of thousands around the world because he never sought miracles for selfish reasons."
  • Amanda Vaccaro... "John's 'Expect A Miracle' cards ushers the dimension of possibility and invites each individual to be open to receive from this dimension. This card is now my trigger for daily expectancy and gratitude for wonders and miracles."
  • Dr Brian Kelly... "John has a rare gift of being able to communicate ideas and principles through stories and to empower audiences. It has often been said by participants that they felt he was 'speaking directly to them individually'."

Miracle Story

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Jacque Rose
Brisbane
Brisbane
Australia

The Spider... How I Helped Cure My Arachnophobia

Submitted into: Miracles of Courage Category,

On: 2014-04-21 10:44:10

I once lived in a flat under an old house in Brisbane.  The underneath of the house had been built in a long time ago, and since the foundations had shifted a little over time, large gaps had appeared at the corners of some of the rooms.  This meant that any kind of crawling or flying critter could come in when they wanted, so I was never quite sure what I would find when I turned on the lights.

One night, I came home to find a very large huntsman spider sitting on the wall.  The wall was quite long, and had a row of three windows with curtains over them between where the spider was, and the gap where it must have come in.  The gap I wanted to shoe it out again.  I froze.

Back then, I suffered from a severe case of  arachnophobia.  I had once hurled a rock twice the size of my head about 6 meters when the spider hiding under it had popped up over the top of the rock to see what was going on and startled me.  I regret to say there was nothing left of the spider once the rock landed on it.

This spider was bigger, about the size of my hand with all my fingers stretched out.  How was I going to get rid of it?!?  Using a broom to nudge it in the right direction meant I would have to get closer to it.  Not going to happen!  Anyone who has tried this method knows that spiders will go in every direction except the one you want them to!  I didn’t want to kill it, so what was I going to do?

The spider just sat there.

I soon realised that it was not going to leap off the wall, hurtle across the distance between us with fangs drooling and attack me, so I started breathing again.

Standing there, looking at it, I wondered if I could somehow just ask it to leave.  A friend had once told me that she was able to ask spiders to leave her house. I really needed a miracle, so I thought I’d give it a go. 

I took a big breath and closed my eyes.  I put myself in the spiders “shoes”, imagining what it must be seeing right now, even going so far as to imagine being sideways, the way the spider was.  I thought about how there was really nothing to eat in flat fit for a spider.  I visualised the path I would have to take, if I was the spider, to get outside, through the gap, to where the food was.  I got really clear on it.  I opened my eyes, back in my own head.  The spider was still there.  Dang! 

As I took my next breath, the spider started walking slowly, heading towards the nearest curtain.

Anyone who has met a Queensland huntsman spider will tell you they don’t walk.  They skitter!  Fast!  But this one didn’t.  It strolled.

The spider went behind the curtain, and I thought to myself “Well, that’s that!  I’ll never get to sleep tonight knowing that’s still in the flat!”.  Just as I finished that thought, the spider strolled out the other side of the curtain over the window, and headed over to the next window.

I stood, stuck to the spot, and watched.

The spider went behind the second curtain, and after a few seconds, out the other side and over to the third and last window.  It didn’t stop there, but kept going, out the other side and over to the gap in the wall, and out into the night.

I think I stood there for another 5 minutes, not moving, with my jaw dropped. I had received my miracle!

Since then, I have a greater appreciation for spiders.  They are very polite most of the time.  I even shared my bedroom with a big one for over 6 months.  The first time it appeared I made sure it understood The House Rules For Spiders:

  1.  Don’t startle me – if you do, I may panic and hurt you!
  2. The bed is off limits at all times!

It listened!  It never startled me.  I never saw it move, but if it was on the wall when I turned on the light, it was gone when I turned back, and it was never on the bed.  When I moved out, one of my friends helping me move house had the spider climb on his hand and carry it outside.

I miss that spider!

 

Jacque Rose

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia